Email marketing double entendre

I cant decide whether this is a very clever piece of email marketing, or a genuine mistake by a slightly naive marketing department?  Certainly the spam filters didn’t seem to mind the reference in the title!

email marketing blooper

And a small update; the website itself provides further entertainment, informing just what these gauntlets protect you from. What is intriguing is that if you search, there appears to be a number of urls for the same product. This makes me think there is some testing going on here to establish the effectiveness of both the organic search and email-driven traffic. It may be that the email marketing team at Girlie Gardening are testing the impact of the different content to establish if their audience responds better to the “humorous” content rather than the rather banal?

Suffice to say, if the intention was to generate a bit of buzz, maybe a viral impact then one would hop this has succeeded if only because gardening apparel deserves to be raised up a notch or two. So what will be next? Perhaps the shovel page will be overlaid with a musical track from the Mock Turtles (go and work it out yourself!). The Fork offering would be too easy, but can you make a joke about knee rests or gardeners hand salve?  Now that would be more of a challenge.

On the same vein of email marketing errors, the surprise about this communication is that the spam filters didn’t block it.

Of course there are many “great” email marketing bloopers, and general marketing errors. heres a few I spotted of late;

Back in June Korean Airlines launched themselves at the potential air travel market in Kenya (yes, I know, not obvious that one) Their launch advert apparently referred to Kenya as  “Land of primitive energy”. The ad needless to say was withdrawn.

And finally, the advertising campaign in the Nordic countries, for vacuum cleaners. The advert was a translation from the UK, and unfortunately the claim made came out as “nothing sucks like an Electrolux”